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Kitchen Basics: Corn on the Cob

By July 16, 2014Kitchen Basics

Summah summah summah corn corn corn.

My favorite.

As I type this I’m listening to some upbeat, fun music, and sipping an iced coffee with some homemade caramel drizzled in.

For as much as I complain about the heat that I don’t like, I sure do love a lot about summer.

I mean, just this corn alone could convert me.

When I got the email saying that corn was available as an add on I freaked out and wrote back right away so I wouldn’t miss out.

I got two dozen, plus the three ears that were in the small box.

Except for one that I used in a stir fry for dinner last night, I decided to process them all today. I didn’t want to risk waiting too long to eat them and having the sugars turn into starch (meaning not so tasty corn).

The first step, whether it’s being eaten now or later, is shucking the corn.

I shucked 26 cobs pretty quickly. Here’s how.

Pinch a portion of the husk right near the top. Get all the layers down to the cob.

Pull down towards the base, revealing a few rows of kernels. Pull it all the way off.

Take remaining portion of the husk firmly in one hand.

Pull down towards the base. Snap off the husk and stalk at the end and clean off any of the silk that remains.

There are a few ways to prepare the corn for the freezer. The first way is to slice it off the cob, raw.

To do this, I like to use a bundt pan (a small bowl inverted inside a large bowl will also work). Stand the cob up on the middle part of the pan and hold it there with one hand. With the other, slice downward with a sharp knife.

The pan will catch most of the kernels as they fall (try not to slice off in long strips, those are more likely to stick together and fall, hitting the side of the pan and scattering all over the counter, cough cough, I didn’t realize this until partway through).

Now the corn is ready for Tomato Corn and Quinoa SaladHam and Greens Chowder, and Shepherd’s Pie of the South.

Another easy way to prepare the corn is to boil the cobs and freeze them whole.

I used my baking cooling racks to cool completely. That way they don’t sit in water and more air circulates around them, cooling them quicker.

Once the cobs are cool they go in to labeled freezer bags. The cobs can be reheated in boiling water or on the barbecue.

If you just can’t wait, enjoy them now, plain, topped with salt and butter, or topped with an herb butter (basil, chives, cilantro, rosemary, and thyme all go well with corn).

Some of my favorite ways to use corn on the cob are:

Grilled with Herb Butter

Raw in Salads (Taco Salad, Salmon and Corn Salad)

Raw in Tomato-Corn Salsa

Boiled (with or without butter and salt, or herb butter)

Ham and Greens Chowder

I would like to try it as:

Crostini with Feta and Herbs

Mixed with cheese and cayenne in a Spicy Grilled Cheese

Added to Guacamole

In Cornbread or Biscuits… it seems like there are endless things that need corn added.

Some yummy corn-binations (see what I did there?!):

corn+bacon+basil+tomato

corn+bell peppers+beef+garlic+potatoes

corn+crab+basil+garlic+lemon juice

corn+tarragon+feta+chicken

A couple of tips:

If there are any grody spots or bugs, just cut those off. The whole cob probably isn’t ruined.

Let the kids help! They can shuck the corn. They could sit on the porch steps or the grass and go to town. If you have a dog, (s)he might enjoy cleaning up, so keep them nearby the kiddos. 😉

Happy Eating!

Author Rachel Oberg

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